Last Updated November 5, 2020

Anti-boycott laws have been challenged in federal court, including in Arkansas, Arizona, Georgia, Kansas, Maryland, and Texas. Three federal district courts have ruled that these states’ laws, all of which require contractors with the state to sign pledges that they don’t boycott Israel, are likely unconstitutional and that boycotts for Palestinian rights are protected by the First Amendment. In all of these cases, however, state legislatures changed the law to exclude the plaintiffs, and moot the lawsuits.

Arkansas

SCREENSHOT OF VICE NEWS CLIP SHOWING SIGN OUTSIDE ARKANSAS TIMES BUILDING.

Arkansas Times LP v. Waldrip

In December 2018, the American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit challenging the Arkansas anti-boycott law on behalf of The Arkansas Times. The paper had lost substantial ad revenue after its publisher refused to sign a pledge that it would not boycott Israel. The paper argued that it should not be compelled to speak against boycotts for Palestinian rights, even though the newspaper itself takes no position on them. In January 2019 the district court dismissed the case. An appeal is currently pending at the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals.

Arizona

MIKKEL JORDAHL, THE ARIZONAN WHO CHALLENGED THE ANTI-BOYCOTT LAW WITH THE ACLU. PHOTO: ACLU.

Jordahl v. Brnovich

In December 2017, the American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit against Arizona’s anti-boycott law on behalf of Mikkel Jordahl. After Arizona adopted its anti-boycott law, Jordahl, an attorney with a solo law practice, faced a difficult choice between his personal commitment to boycotts in support of Palestinian freedom and his professional interest in contracting with the state to provide legal services to people incarcerated in Coconino County, Arizona. In September 2018, the federal district court in Arizona blocked enforcement of the unconstitutional law. In 2019, the state legislature amended the law to exclude the plaintiff, rendering the case moot.

PROFESSOR HATEM BAZIAN, WHO SUED ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY. PHOTO:

American Muslims for Palestine v. Arizona State University

In March 2018, the Council on American-Islamic Relations filed a lawsuit on behalf of American Muslims for Palestine and Dr. Hatem Bazian. Dr. Bazian had been invited to speak at Arizona State University but was required to sign a certification that he would not boycott Israel. After CAIR challenged the state law requiring the certification, the university offered Dr. Bazian a contract without the certification requirement.

Georgia

SCREENSHOT OF EMPIRE FILES WITH ABBY MARTIN.

Martin v. Wrigley

In February 2020, the Council on American-Islamic Relations and the Partnership for Civil Justice Fund filed a lawsuit on behalf of journalist and filmmaker Abby Martin, who had been invited to speak at a conference at Georgia Southern University. The event was canceled after Martin refused to sign a pledge to not boycott Israel, required under Georgia law. The lawsuit is pending at the federal court for the Northern District of Georgia.

Kansas

ESTHER KOONTZ, LEAD PLAINTIFF IN AN ACLU LAWSUIT WHICH CHALLENGES A KANSAS ANTI-BOYCOTT LAW. PHOTO: ACLU.ORG

Koontz v. Watson

In October 2017, the American Civil Liberties Union filed a challenge against the Kansas anti-boycott law on behalf of math teacher Esther Koontz. Koontz engaged in a boycott for Palestinian rights based on her Mennonite church’s endorsement of the boycott. In order to participate in a teacher training program, Koontz was required to sign a certification that she does not boycott Israel. After Koontz sued, a district court blocked enforcement of the unconstitutional law in January 2018. The state legislature later amended the law to exclude the plaintiff, rendering the case moot.

Maryland

SAQIB ALI. PHOTO: --1MSU-LAX/WIKIPEDIA

Ali v. Hogan

In January 2019, the Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR) filed a lawsuit against Maryland’s anti-boycott executive order on behalf of Saqib Ali, a software engineer who was unable to apply for contracts with the state because of Maryland’s requirement that he pledge not to boycott Israel. The case was dismissed in October 2020 after a judge found that Ali did not have standing to challenge the law because he had not applied for or been awarded a state contract.

Texas

BAHIA AMAWI. PHOTO:SCREENSHOT OF INTERCEPT INTERVIEW.

Amawi v. Pflugerville Independent School District

In December 2018, the Council on American-Islamic Relations filed a lawsuit on behalf of Bahia Amawi, a speech language pathologist who had worked with Arabic-speaking students in an Austin suburb since 2009. Amawi was told that under Texas law she would have to certify that she would not boycott Israel in order to renew her contract with the school district. The case was consolidated with Pluecker v. Paxton below.

Pluecker v. Paxton

In December 2018, the American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit against the Texas anti-boycott law on behalf of four plaintiffs: two students who were told they had to sign pledges not to boycott Israel in order to judge high school debate tournaments, a reporter who was compelled to sign the certification to keep his job at a Texas A&M radio station, and a writer who lost two contracts as a translator and a speaker at the University of Houston for his refusal to sign the certification. After the case was consolidated with Amawi v. Pflugerville Independent School District above, the district court blocked enforcement of the unconstitutional law. In May 2019, the Texas legislature amended the law to exclude the plaintiffs, rendering the case moot.